Fisherman’s friend – my ultimate parsley sauce

Today is just one of those average days. I got up, I went to work, came home and got back into the kitchen the first opportunity I had. I fancied a change and figured that I had been going pretty heavy on the calories of late, so fancied something a little lighter. In this case I went for a pair of wonderfully blushing, pink salmon fillets.

I adore fish, when utilized properly it soars above most animal products in my opinion and really does have something special to offer. Sea bass, Tuna, haddock, Pollock, breem, they all have their own qualities to bring to a dish and sometimes just by adding a little something it can drive it up to the next level. Which brings me to the point of this post, my parsley sauce. Its seriously simple but very good!

What you will need:

200ml whole milk
1 tablespoon white flour
1.5 tablespoons butter
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
Hand full of flat leaf parsley, finely chopped
1 Tablespoon olive oil
Pinch of fine sea salt.

Method:

1. Add the olive oil, butter and flour to a pan on a low heat and mix together as the butter melts. Stir until combined into a paste like consistency.
2. Pour in the milk a little at a time, stirring constantly.
3. Add the mustard, salt and parsley.
4. Keep the sauce on a low heat for around 5 minutes, giving it a stir to make sure it doesn’t burn around the sides.

And that’s it! Just spread over your favorite fish and enjoy. Its tasty and its simple. Not a combination people usually turn their nose up at…oh and the mustard really does make a difference to this one as well so don’t forget it!

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Burgathon edition #3 The maple steak burger

This week brings a whole different kind of animal to the burgathon table to finish the series. It brings together two sides of the spectrum and mashes them together to create something so moreish, I struggle to not eat it every day. This is easily my favourite burger so far. The Maple bagel burger is a congregation of sweet and savoury flavours joining forces to excite the taste buds and whip your senses into frenzy.

This one is inspired, just like the mardi gras burger, by the cultural melting pot that is the USA. The blend of flavours and culinary diversity that comes together to create some truly unique food. The soft bagel, the sweet, warm, spiced burger and the mellow, mustardy undertones of the dressing complete the package and create something truly fantastic.

 

So to get us started youll need:

For the burger

600g lean steak mince
3 tablespoons maple syrup
large pinch cracked black pepper
1 tablespoon mild chili flakes
pinch fine sea salt
4 fresh white bagels
8 slices pastrami
8 slices good Swiss cheese
chopped salad leaves of your choice, sliced tomato and a splash of olive oil.

For the dressing

1 tablespoon sour cream
1 tablespoon good quality mayonnaise
1 teaspoon Worcester sauce
1 teaspoon English mustard
pinch white pepper.

Method:

  1. Combine the mince, chili flakes, maple syrup, salt and pepper in a bowl. With clean hands mix well until all seasoning and the maple syrup is evenly distributed.
  2. split into 4 evenly sized balls and pat down into discs around an inch thick.
  3. Cover and leave in the fridge for 10-20 minutes to firm up.
  4. preheat a griddle pan on a medium heat and add a little oil to each side of the burgers.
  5. Add the burgers to the griddle 2 at a time and cook for 7 minutes on each side. Preheat your grill on high.
  6. Grill the bagels on both sides until they start to brown.
  7. cut up 2 pieces of pastrami per burger, top with a few pieces of cheese and slide under the grill for a few minutes. then remove and rest for a few moments.
  8. Mix all of the dressing ingredients together and add it right the way around the base of the bagels, followed by the salad, the burger with the pastrami and now soft Swiss cheese, capped off with the top half of the bagel and press down a little to push it all together.
  9. Then enjoy it! it really is a show stopper!

that completes my trio of simple but effective burger recipes for you to try, I hope you enjoyed them! Keep your eyes peeled for new burger recipes and more on food gecko!

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Burgathon edition #2: The big pig

This week I have got a simple burger recipe for you that packs a real punch. Sometimes, as this recipe shows its not all about how complex you can make the dish, its the quality and integrity of the ingredients you use in it.

Britain has a great farming culture to call upon when we want to make great food and we have a great variety of choice when it comes to one of our most popular meat products, pork. Not many people are aware of just how diverse our livestock is, especially when we talk swine. There are a lot of different breeds available and it isn’t limited to the little pink babes that are the go to mental images when we say the word pig. There are a host of different shapes and sizes bred in Britain, for example; the Berkshire is black with some white markings, the British lop is the famed pink piglet we know and love, the lovable looking ginger Tamworth and the black speckled Gloucestershire old spot, all of which have different attributes to bring to your cooking, be it superior bacon or a better quality rack of pork ribs, your butcher will guide you in the right direction.

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This recipe in particular for me is a winner, I am a big lover of pork. I love the fact that you can utilise everything a pig has to offer, and the diversity of those products. For this tip of the hat to the noble pigs that feed us so regularly I use a good quality pork mince, ask your butcher for the best he or she has and just see what breed it is from if your interested, it might surprise you!

M favourite pig breed. the Tamworth.

M favourite pig breed. the Tamworth.

so what you’ll need to make 2 burgers:

  • 500g of pork mince
  • 5-6 well sized fresh sage leaves, finely sliced
  • 2 tspn minced fresh garlic
  • large pinch fine sea salt
  • 2-3 grinds of black pepper
  • 2 Portobello mushrooms
  • Handful of baby leaf spinach
  • 2 thick slices of Claxton mild blue cheese
  • 2 burger buns of your choice, halved
  • Dijon mustard
  • 2 tbsp Olive oil

method:

  1. In a large bowl, combine the pork mince, sage, garlic, salt and pepper and mix with clean hands until you can make one large ball with the mixture.
  2. Split the mixture into 2 evenly shaped balls and pat down into large discs.
  3. Cover with cling film and pop in the fridge for 20 minutes.
  4. Place a griddle pan on a medium heat, and apply a little oil to each side of each burger. Preheat your grill on medium/high.
  5. Place the burger on the griddle and cook for 6-7 minutes on each side. then remove from the heat to rest in a warm place, check the middle of the burger by pressing it with your thumb, it should be as firm as the outside if it is cooked all the way through.
  6. Place the mushrooms under the grill and cook for a few minutes on each side until it starts to flatten. remove from grill.
  7. place your bread rolls under the grill until browned, repeat for both sides.
  8. place a teaspoon of Dijon on the bottom of the bun, followed by some spinach, rest the burger on the spinach and place a slice of the blue cheese over the burger, followed by a mushroom and cap it with the remaining side of the toasted bun.

I loved this one, and I hope you do too. Coming up for edition 3 we have something a little more American coming your way, an ode to the food culture and diversity of flavour available in the one and only New York city. The maple steak burger!

Influence in the kitchen: the formative years of a budding cook

This week I have been pondering what started it all for me. What was it that really got me into my kitchen and fuelled my intrigue? Why did I start cooking and what drives me to continue? I am going to talk about these things in this article and see if i can retrace my steps a little bit to see what made me really develop my greedy streak.

I believe it all started when I was around 8 and in junior school, I used to watch ready steady cook and things like that but not really understand anything that was going on, I just used to think Ainsley Harriot was funny! I also watched a TV show with Gary Rhodes on CBBC (the name escapes me) where they used to make all manner of strange and freaky dishes with a few children taking part in the process. I always wanted to go on that show. So the interest was there from a young age but I didn’t really get up and want to try anything further than cupcakes from a DIY kit until I started watching the early shows from Jamie Oliver. Jamie’s boyish enthusiasm and fresh take on cooking opened my eyes to a new world of possibility in the kitchen and really gave me a will to get in there and do it myself. This led to a few over cooked pasta dishes and a new found reliance on smoke alarms, but it was all an essential part of the learning curve in my (culinary) formative years. I came through this period not really taking much in, but the genuine passion for it was starting to seep through and grow within me. You should have seen my face when I cooked my first fry up for my Nan when she stayed over one weekend; it was like I was singing for Simon Cowell. The judgement meant the world to me it really did. Part of me feels the same to this day when I get somebody to try something new I have made.

 

My first real inspiration was a certain Mr. Oliver.

My first real inspiration was a certain Mr. Oliver.

This brings me to between the ages of 14 and 16 where I was becoming aware of the effect of herbs in dishes. Our new and increasing reliance on the internet and search engines at the time meant learning became easier; I was starting to understand what I was seeing on the TV now and able to translate those things to the plate. I was able to understand the importance of timing and the scientific aspect of how cooking effects ingredients too, which provided a better platform with which to increase my actual skills and the techniques I was using. By this time Jamie was starting to move into the whole food revolution stage of his career and concentrating on really making a difference in young peoples eating habits, which was admirable but not as interesting for me at that time. So I started branching out a bit and watching shows and reading books by other chefs I wasn’t as aware of at the time like the Hairy bikers, Rick stein, Gennaro Contaldo and Antonio Carluccio, who all became some of my more favoured influences. These new takes on cooking introduced me to other aspects of the gastronomic journey like baking, making fresh pasta, filleting fish and working with fresh shellfish to name a few.

I believe in the 20th century the modern budding cook is, like me, mainly influenced by what they see on their television. This is good in one way as it makes cooking more accessible and less out of reach for some people who believe it is impossible to even comprehend reading the recipe for a lovely homemade burger or a simple pasta dish. This brings me to thinking about what inspired the TV chefs we already know and love? The media had less coverage of the food side of things up until the last decade or so. So was it just their parents cooking that they talk about during their shows and in their books or were they inspired, like me, by the available media at the time? Or was it, even though there were less food orientated presenters on TV, the high quality of the small amount of them that were on the box, a good example would be the late, great, Keith Floyd. Only they will know what really started them cooking of course, But Keith Floyd cannot be ignored as one of British television’s major totems for the foodie revolution we see on our screens today. He was and always will be the godfather of UK TV chefs.

 

Keith Floyd. An unforgettable part of British TV culture

Keith Floyd. An unforgettable part of British TV culture

Nowadays people are inevitably shaped in lots of ways by what they see on their TV, and as I have said it played a major part in getting me to where I am today with my adoration for food. So I could say I owe a lot to the television for giving me these seemingly one to one sessions with such phenomenal chefs and their books for providing me with an insight into their notebooks. Today I admire a huge amount of people that send my creative juices flowing into over drive, most notably the lasting impression a certain Valentine Warner has had on not only the way that I cook but the way that I look at food. Val has that spark for food just as Jamie did the first time I saw him but conveys a much deeper understanding of where the food comes from, he is a modern chef who embraces old practices like hunting your own rabbits and fishing for your own fish, that some people see as pointless due to the convenience of their supermarket. I can honestly say I share his enthusiasm to be part of the whole process, to catch, create and enjoy. He is credited with giving me a much better understanding of this and really inspiring me to push on and get my hands dirty. Along with Val, the hairy bikers, Gennaro and all of those amazing people continue to inspire me every day, but not just through their shows and books but the work they do to create them. The boundaries they push and the amazing, beautiful food they create with their individual styles serve to inspire us all.

One of my personal favourite TV chefs, Valentine Warner

One of my personal favourite TV chefs, Valentine Warner

To conclude I think I have made it clear how important the good old TV cooking show was in my early years of cooking but I can honestly say the thing that drives me on today is quite simple. Its the people who live and breathe it. The people who go out every day to bring people the best of the best, the writers, the unknown home cooks, the chefs, the farmers and the butchers. I have a vast amount of respect for every part of the system that manages to come together, so we can have such a fantastic range of things to choose from on a daily basis. I hope that the present line-up of TV chefs, bloggers, magazine article writers, cafe owners and street food vendors can inspire the next wave of great professionals beyond what is available today as the standard just keeps getting better with every passing year.

So that’s it really, a touch on what really inspires me and a hope that others, no matter how it comes about, fall in love with food just like I did.

 

Phil

Burgathon edition #1: Southern american soul meets british beef

Hi everybody,

This post marks the beginning of a series of 3 recipes in celebration of the Burger, be it lamb, beef, pork or chicken as long as it is tucked up nicely in a bun of your choosing with a few tasty accompaniments it can really make your day tucking into a wholesome, home made burger.

The reason for this trio of meaty creations is my truly amazing experience in September competing in the grand final of the battle of the burgers competition… What more would somebody need to inspire them to carry on making something than to do what you love with some really great people. The smells, the taste and the textures always get me exited when it comes to any food but nothing brings out my inner child like a big, juicy burger.

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My experience in London was bordering on life changing, I met some fantastic people and felt like I came away a better cook. I took my A game and I came away proud of how well I had done, now having cooked for JB Gill from the boy band JLS, also wasn’t too shabby to put on my culinary CV. I made two appearances on local radio, one of which was back to back with an interview with JB, so that was interesting to listen to! My 15 minutes of fame did not go to my head though I promise.

So really quickly here is a picture of the final Bengal Burger, I was incredibly proud of it and will be back next year for sure to try and take the top prize.

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That brings us to the new recipe I have written for the first recipe of the burgathon. I call it the Mardi Gras burger and it is a tip of the hat to the bustling streets of New Orleans and the zingy kick of the Cajun and Creole styles of cooking that give southern America its soul and heart. I have combined the warmth of Louisiana style liquor with the zap of tangy tomatoes to create a sauce that is the perfect blanket for the spiced up beef burger. I hope every bite takes you straight into bourbon street, the trombones and whistles ringing in the background of your mind while the Cayenne crackles away, warming your inner Cajun!

The Mardi Gras burger

Ingredients:

The Mardi Gras burger sauce

  • 1 White onion, Diced.
  • 2 Tbspn Olive oil.
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced.
  • 125ml Southern comfort/ Spirit of Louisiana liquor.
  • 1 tin of chopped tomatoes.
  • 2 tbspn brown sugar.
  • 3 Tbspn Worcester sauce.
  • 1 heaped tbspn good tomato ketchup.
  • Large pinch of sea salt.
  • 1 Tspn white pepper.

The burger

  • 600g lean steak mince.
  • 1 1/2 tbspn Cayenne pepper.
  • 1 tbspn Smoked paprika.
  • Large pinch sea salt.
  • Large pinch black pepper.
  • 2 Tbspn olive oil.
  • 4 slices of smoked cheddar.
  • 4 Good quality seeded buns.
  • Handful of mixed salad leaves.

Method:

Firstly you will want to get cracking with the sauce.

  1. Put the oil into a large frying pan and bring to a medium heat and spread the oil out evenly.
  2. Add the onions and garlic and cook until the garlic starts to soften and becomes fragrant.
  3. Add the Southern comfort and simmer for 5 minutes until it reduces to half its volume, cooking out the majority of the alcohol.
  4. Add the tomatoes, sugar, Worcester sauce, ketchup, salt and pepper. Cook on the medium heat for an additional 10 minutes, stirring regularly until the sauce thickens and the tomato juices reduce and begin to emulsify.
  5. Take off the heat and leave to cool, then drop the contents of the pan into a food processor and pulse a few times. This will give it a thicker consistency and thicken it up a little.
  6. Empty into a small container and put to one side to await its meaty vehicle.
Before and after... Father and son.

Before and after… Father and son.

For the burger…

  1. Combine the meat, cayenne, paprika, salt and pepper in a large bowl and mix well with clean hands.
  2. Split and roll into 4 evenly sized balls.
  3. Pat the balls down into approximately 2 cm thickness and lay on a plate, cover the plate with cling film.
  4. Refrigerate patties for 20 minutes.
  5. Preheat a griddle pan on a medium heat. Pre-heat your grill too.
  6. add a dash of oil to both sides of each burger and gently rub it in.
  7. Place 2 patties at a time on the griddle and cook for around 6-7 minutes on each side.
  8. At the end of the second sides cooking period, add the cheese to the top of the burger and leave to melt for a further 2 minutes.
  9. Take the Burgers off the heat and leave to rest in a warm place for 3 minutes.
  10. Cut the buns in half and grill each side until slightly browned.
  11. Add the mixed leaves to the bottom part of the bun, followed by the burger, top it with the sauce and cap it off with the top half of the bun.
This sucker got soul!

This sucker got soul!

Now tuck into the zingy little beast and enjoy with your friends and family. This baby has real soul!!… Can anybody hear a brass band!? I look forward to next week as number #2 is certainly a porky little number!

Phil

Operation: Eat bunny

Hi all and welcome to the start of my personal mission. The aim of which is to convert people to a different way of thinking about what goes into their food.

I am an adventurous eater and I take an enormous amount of enjoyment in trying new things, while taking even more joy in introducing other people to new things. This has led me to what I am writing about now, as not nearly enough people can really appreciate the kind of great produce our country has to offer if they are limiting themselves to what is available at the supermarket meat counter. This is not the consumers fault, but supermarket’s specialise in providing people with products they think sell well, which includes the usual cuts of beef, lamb, pork and a sprinkling of ‘acceptably fresh’ fish and I see it as a real shame that butchers are closing down all over our country because we are preferring the corporate convenience to the art of providing real, local produce in a butchers shop. The supermarket chains are forcing us to not have an option, due to killing off all of the independent businesses in local areas around their stores with mass produced (and sometimes low quality) meats. They mostly care about profit margins not quality of produce, the recent horse meat scandal is a good example.

I have no issue with using supermarkets for things and I am certainly not saying they aren’t great ways to get a half decent range of foods and ingredients on your doorstep on short notice, especially when they are open 24 hours a day. My only gripe with it is they limit the opportunity to try new things because they have set products that they stock in every store, unlike your local butcher. who can give you what you ask for or maybe offer you something new, because they prepare it right in front of you with their vast knowledge of the animals they use.

My granddad was a butcher for a number of years so I have an appreciation for the trade, a trade that is dying. This is why I am concerned, not because I am standing on my soap box and hopping on my high horse trying to feel superior to people because I like to try new things and they don’t, what I am saying however is that because we are becoming so detached from the process of the butchering of animals, it is changing the way we see our food. Nearly gone are the days you see the pig hanging from the hook in the window as you go in to buy the joint for your Sunday roast, now all you see is the rows of air tight packaging and labels. There is no connection to the fact it has been reared on a farm, cared for, put down and cut into that form by fantastic, skilled people. I believe this is slowly changing us into fussier eaters. Which is not a problem but it is a real shame. As I really don’t like the idea of people missing out on some truly great food just because it is not on the shelf at ASDA due to them deciding it’s not what you want. Ultimately, there are less options out there for us as consumers without the family butcher physically being able to offer you different options and sticking to what we know from the shelf.

It’s for this reason certain animals and former staples in the UK are fading away and causing people to be desensitised to what actually goes on to produce what ends up on their plate. A perfect example is when I stated I was on the hunt for a few rabbits to experiment with and was met with absolute shock and awe by my friends. ‘That’s just wrong’ or ‘I couldn’t eat a rabbit its just plain sick’ and even ‘Your evil’ which really got to me, as I am not evil!. Less than 50 years ago it was possibly on par with chicken as one of the more commonly eaten meats in England. There are estimated to be over 40 million rabbits in the UK and getting your hands on one isn’t really hard, I got a whole jointed rabbit for £3.50 at my local butchers (Chandlers, Stafford road, Wolverhampton). The meat is darker than chicken, having much more depth in flavour and being more gamey. Although very similar to the untrained tongue, given to any unknowing chicken lover and I am pretty sure I’d get the thumbs up.

If you haven’t tried it yet I would encourage you to give it a go at least once, and if you don’t like it, fair enough, But….

 

The biggest problem in peoples thinking is this:

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I love animals. I do. I have a pet dog and I’ve had many pets in the past so I can, in one sense understand that the picture above has a certain warmth to it. He’s cute, nobody can deny it. But he still tastes pretty great and in these times of apparent austerity people don’t have the money they used to, while still spending on expensive cuts of meat and overlooking perfectly good alternatives because they used to have of rabbit as a pet when they were 7. I just don’t understand the logic when people eat lamb, but say rabbit is too cute to eat. Its well worth a go, it really is. Rabbit is just one option too, there are a vast range of game birds out there that are less popular today that make great eating like Grouse, Pheasant, Partridge, Wood pigeon or my personal favourite niche bird, Guinea fowl.

Your Lamb shank used to look like this!

Your Lamb shank used to look like this!

Something else that has been a point of discussion between me and a few friends is my willingness to get out there and physically find and hunt wild game, which was also met with mostly negative views of how I could kill something. I don’t have a problem with that view but it’s certainly how society has conditioned us to be. As I said above, we no longer look at a joint of gammon or pork and see a pig, we see its shiny plastic wrapping and the thick piece of fat that we all love and fight over when it’s roasted in its crunchy, golden glory. I believe knowing where your food has come from is a great way to get the best out of it in the kitchen, so this post is the beginning of my journey to do all the leg work so you don’t have to.

I am becoming more and more interested in being a part of the journey from field to plate and will be going to great lengths to experience hunting and producing the food we eat in the coming months from Signal Crayfish to game birds, visiting farms and butchers. Hopefully I will be able to give you everything you could ever wish to know, accompanied by some great recipes for you to try too. Expect a lot more on this very soon…

So to start off, here’s my recipe for all the culinary braves out there willing to try to battle their preconceptions and try eating some really great wild rabbit!

This is a brilliant but simple little recipe for you to enjoy with your family or to scoff all by yourself, with a changed attitude towards rabbit and genuinely bring a big food induced smile to your face. This can serve around 3-4 people.

I served this with black pudding and really luscious mashed potato, which I do also cover below.

Stewed wild rabbit. Using a slow cooker.

 

Ingredients:

  • 1 Whole jointed wild rabbit (available from a good butcher at under £5)
  • 4 large rashers of un-smoked bacon, chopped into lardons.
  • 4 minced garlic cloves
  • 125ml white wine
  • 1.5 pints of vegetable stock
  • 8 chantenay carrots, tops cut off but left whole
  • 1 whole medium white onion
  • 2 celery hearts, chopped roughly into chunks
  • sea salt
  •  black pepper
  • Olive oil

additional ingredients:

  • 8 Large potatoes great for mashing, peeled and cut into 4 pieces
  • 3 tablespoons natural yoghurt
  • 1 heaped tablespoon of cream cheese
  • 1 teaspoon of butter
  • salt, white pepper
  • 6 even pieces of good black pudding

Method:

  1. Add the olive oil to a pan and bring to a medium heat. Pre-heat your slow cooker ON ‘High’,
  2. Add the rabbit to the pan and brown off evenly on all sides. You may want to do this in batches of 2 pieces at a time, then remove from the pan and put to one side.
  3. Add the bacon and garlic, cooking them in the rabbit enriched olive oil until the bacon starts to brown. Then remove the bacon.
  4. Turn the heat up to a medium-high heat and pour in the wine and 500ml of the stock, stirring well. This will bond all the lovely juices and fats that have escaped the meat with the liquid. Simmer for 5-6 minutes.
  5. lay the rabbit evenly in the bottom of the slow cooker, covering it with the remaining stock.
  6. Add the carrots, chopped celery, bacon, onion, big pinch of sea salt and black pepper. Followed by the reduced pan liquid.
  7. Give it a quick gentle stir without disturbing the underlying rabbit, pop the lid on and leave to cook for 4 hours.
  8. Around 40 minutes before the rabbit has finished its lazy 4 hours in its golden bath of yumminess, fill a large saucepan with water, add a pinch of salt and bring to the boil.
  9. Add the potatoes and boil until they slide from a skewer and are soft and fluffy, but not crumbling into the water. (Usually about 30-35 minutes give or take on high)
  10. Mash well with the butter, yoghurt, cream cheese and a pinch of salt and pepper to season. Pre heat your grill.
  11. Grill both sides of the black pudding until crisp and warmed through.
  12. Removed the rabbit from the stewed vegetables and stock and rest for a few minutes. Strip the meat from the bones with a fork. Be careful as there are some tricky little ones hiding in there.
  13. Serve the now shredded rabbit with a big ball of mash and a few pieces of black pudding.
  14. Add the carrots from the slow cooker on the side (which should now be beautifully tender and flavourful)
  15. Finally, take a few cups of the liquid from the slow cooker and add to a pan on a medium-high heat and reduce for a few minutes until it thickens slightly. (I do cheat sometimes and add a heaped tablespoon of onion gravy granules to thicken it up and create something quite unique and a little more intense) Add a few spoons worth over the rabbit, and the potato. Finishing it off nicely. It truly is heavenly.

I hope the recipe is to your liking and I will close with this, the only reason I have written this is because I care. I care about great food. I care about people making the most of what we have. I care about people not missing out on great produce and finally I care about great, skilled people being wasted and fading away. Don’t be scared, go to your local butcher or green grocer and buy something you wouldn’t usually buy and try something new. You might love it.

Phil

Changing of the seasons

It has been a while since my last proper article and I am very sorry!. Preparation for the trip to London took over my schedule in between work.

Normal service will now be resumed with plenty of things in store in the coming weeks to get your taste buds squeaking with excitement and your empty belly impatiently grumbling for your next feed. Today had a very Autumnal nip to the air and it really started to hit home that summer is fizzling out quicker than anybody would like to admit. The abrupt change in the weather shifts my focus from the bright and colourful al fresco lunches in the garden to hearty, warming soups and huge roasts with beautiful crisp root vegetables and thick, rich gravy. The conkers are preparing to drop and the leaves are slowly making the transformation from their emerald green to their rustic, golden brown and that means a change in direction for everybody interested in seasonal culinary adventure. Put the kettle on and dust off your casserole dishes. Its going to be good!.

SAM_0771

 

Autumn is a great time to break out your crock pots or slow cooker. As I always say, never be afraid to try new things, and now is as good a time as any to make a change. A great suggestion for a seasonal alternative to the norm is rabbit. There are over 40 million rabbits in United Kingdom and we seldom use them in our modern day cooking, Which is a shame as now is the perfect time to get them. It’s just after mating season has passed giving them chance to feed and recharge so they are back in prime condition around now. Don’t let the image of them being a pet put you off, they were once a staple in this country and usually at under £5 for a whole rabbit, it can really save you some money too. Ill be developing a rabbit stew recipe for you very soon.

What’s new?

This coming month (October) will be Burger month on Gecko, celebrating my amazing experience with the www.simplybeefandlamb.co.uk battle of the burgers competition where, even though I didn’t win, I felt I did myself and the blog justice in showing the passion I have for cooking and food in general. It was an amazing experience where I met some incredible people and also learned a few things too from some talented cooks. I will be writing a full run down in the next 24 hours about my experience but thank you to everybody who made my presence there possible and supported me along the way.

So I hope everybody is still enjoying the last of their summer creations and prepared for all of the delights that the transformation into easily my second favourite season of the year.

Phil