The hog-mornay

For the first real recipe post of 2016 I thought I might as well do something I am known for and share a seasonally appropriate burger recipe with you all, starting as I mean to go on with something a little different while also keeping it totally achievable for cooks of any level.

As the title suggests I cooked this recipe on new years eve as a final seasonal blow out before the dark cloud of January rolled in from afar to rain on our festive parade. I am not a fan of January. I just find it comes across as the killjoy of all 12 months, hitting you faster than a speeding train it takes you from the festivities of Christmas and the week that follows and shoves you straight back into the harsh light of reality. A month long Monday. The seemingly eternal dark until the post Christmas payday! It’s not all bad but I love Christmas and all the build up that comes with it so when January takes that away from us I get a bit of a grump on the first week or so.

All this considered though, I do enjoy getting together with family and celebrating new year with good food while watching the Jools Holland Hootenanny until Big Ben chimes. As I have stated previously we have just bought a new house so we were determined to have people round as much as possible as we love entertaining and cooking for people, so I developed this recipe specifically for new years eve and it was a great success.

What is it? 

Pork – three ways. A burger with a giant pig in a blanket, topped with a rich Mornay sauce on a wholemeal bun with a touch of rocket.

What do I need?

  • 500g pork mince
  • 200g diced sweet potato
  • 1 heaped tbsp. Cajun seasoning
  • 1 grated apple
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 red onions, finely diced
  • Rocket
  • salt and pepper
  • Olive oil
  • 4 Wholemeal rolls

For the giant pigs in blankets

  • 4 97% pork sausages. I used Heck.
  • 4 large rashers of Smoked back bacon

For the Mornay sauce

  • 2 1/2 tbsp. butter
  • 3 tbsp. white flour
  • 2 cups of warmed milk
  • 2 big handfuls grated Gruyere cheese
  • Salt and pepper

What do I do?

  1. To start with you need to bring a saucepan of lightly salted water to the boil and cook the sweet potato for 10-15 minutes, or until soft enough to slide off a skewer or fork. Then drain them and put them aside to cool, then mash them thoroughly.
  2. In a hot pan with a little oil, lightly fry the onions until soft then put aside to cool fully (Do this alongside cooking the sweet potatoes).
  3. In a bowl add the pork, apple, garlic, Cajun seasoning, onion, mash potato and season generously with the salt and pepper. Bring together well and split into 4 evenly loaded patty shapes. (If you have any left over they make great little meatballs for a pizza!) Cover in cling film and place in the fridge to chill.
  4. In a small saucepan on a low heat add the butter and wait for it to start to melt, then pop in the flour and stir until it comes together into a lumpy texture. Slowly add a little milk at a time while continuously mixing to bring together and thicken. Repeat until all the milk is used up then add the cheese and keep stirring until you get a thick cheese sauce, then season well. Add more cheese if you want it to thicken up a bit more.
  5. Heat up a grill, griddle pan or in my case I used a George Forman health grill. Butterfly the sausage and wrap it in the bacon. Place it on the hot griddle and weigh it down, either with another pan or close the lid of the health grill to avoid any major curling when the sausage starts to cook. Cook for 4-5 minutes on a medium heat and then turn over and repeat until crispy.
  6. In another hot pan, fry the burgers for 4-5 minutes a side until browned off and cooked all the way through. Serve immediately on the wholemeal rolls, on a small bed of the rocket, followed by the burger, then the pig in blanket, topped with a good helping of the sauce. Cap it with the top half of the roll and get them served before you go at them yourself!

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Super sunday meatloaf

America has gone through quite the renaissance in terms of the worlds perception of their food in recent years, they are now supremely fashionable due to the popularity of their incredible barbeque recipes. Not a day goes by that I don’t see a new pulled pork product or a BBQ 20 hour beef option added to another menu at the bigger chains or even some of the smaller, more independent cafes and restaurants and for good reason.

America knows how to utilise great meat very effectively and create some incredible food. One dish in particular that I have always admired is the quintessential stateside family meal, the meatloaf. As somebody who grew up in the United kingdom watching shows from the USA I had always heard about meatloaf but never fully understood what it was until a few years ago when I put some effort into research. I have been working on a recipe since then and found a few pointers along the way to get the best from it and to be fair I am very happy with how it turns out now when I make it, as the first ones that I made were dry and a little bland. I didn’t really feel like I had captured the essence of the homely experience that the meatloaf represented to so many families across the pond, until now. I am happy enough with it to share the recipe for you to try at home!

What you’ll need:

  • 400g lean minced beef
  • 400g lean pork mince
  • 6 good quality pork sausage, removed from skins (I used pork and red onion sausage with 85% pork)
  • A handful of flat leaf parsley, chopped
  • 1 carrot, diced
  • 1 celery stick, diced
  • 1 red onion, diced
  • 4 cloves garlic finely sliced
  • 1 medium egg
  • 75g wholemeal breadcrumbs
  • 100g smoked streaky bacon
  • 4-5 tablespoons of maple syrup
  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • Olive oil

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What to do:

  1. In a frying pan, add 1 tablespoon of oil and add the celery, carrots, onion and garlic and fry until slightly softened and the onions start to become milder in colour. Take it off the heat and leave it to cool.
  2. Preheat the oven at 180 degrees or equivalent.
  3. In a large bowl mix the beef, pork and sausage meat with the breadcrumbs, egg, parsley and season well with the salt and pepper. Add the now cooled veg from the pan and mix well to combine.
  4. In an oiled loaf tin pack the mix in to the top and turn out to reveal a nice uniform shape onto a lightly oiled baking tray.
  5. Wrap in the bacon so it is tightly packed in around the sides, leaving both end pieces exposed.
  6. Brush the maple syrup over the top of the bacon and around the sides and top with a bit of pepper.
  7. Bake in the oven for 45 minutes to an hour. until crispy on the outside or it reads around 77 degrees on a skewer.
  8. Remove from the tray carefully, and slice into even slices to serve to your family and friends! Best served with gravy or like I do with a sour cream and chive sauce, roast sweet potatoes and a big salad. Heaven.

As always play around with it and see what you can make of it yourself, this is but a blank canvas to get your juices flowing but it does certainly work as it is, so I implore you to give it a try.

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Thanks for reading and enjoy!

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14 hour pulled pork with green goblin BBQ sauce

This week was a week that just seemed to come together quite well. I was looking for something to inspire me to write a new recipe for the site, then my mom came through the door with a big chunk of pork shoulder and asked me to cook it on Sunday. Problem solved.

A few years ago I tested a recipe for pulled pork and took it into my work at the time and managed to feed 8 people, it was a resounding success but I have always wanted to tweak it but never got round to it. So today I give you the fully tweaked and improved recipe for a very satisfying and very fun meal that can provide something different at your BBQ’s this year or put a new spin on your dinner parties… By the way, this one is best done before bed as it cooks while your asleep!

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What you will need:

  • A slow cooker
  • One 500ml bottle of green goblin cider (or preferred alternative)
  • around 2kg of pork shoulder. Fat removed.
  • 1/4 bottle of Worcestershire sauce
  • 4 tablespoons dried oregano
  • 4 tablespoons smoked paprika
  • 3 tablespoons garlic granules
  • 1 tablespoon powdered ginger
  • 100ml quality chicken stock
  • Salt
  • White pepper

To add for the sauce:

  • One tablespoon ground cumin
  • 2 tablespoons maple syrup
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 1/2 tube of tomato puree
  • 3 teaspoons of cornflour

Method:

  1. Make sure the pork fits into the slow cooker, if not cut it down a little. Add the cider (take a sip just to make sure its not poisonous!)
  2. Add all of the other ingredients and mix well to create and intriguing little bath for the pork. Delicately place all of the pork into the slow cooker and put the lid on. Turn the slow cooker on to ‘slow’. Go to bed.

Day 2

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  1. After 14 hours of cooking I removed the pork (slowly and carefully as by this point it just falls apart) and put it onto a separate plate. Remove the cooking elixir and pour into a saucepan on a high heat. Add all of the additional sauce ingredients apart from the cornflour and reduce for 15 minutes.
  2. Transfer the pork back into the slow cooker and tear apart with a pair of forks. it wont put up much of a fight by now!
  3. Now mix the cornflour with a little water and add to the sauce, simmer on a medium to low heat for an additional 5 minutes until it thickens. Add a little salt and pepper to taste.
  4. Add a few ladles of the sauce back into the pork and mix well.
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14 hour pulled pork

Serve it however you like, its very versatile. On taco’s, in wraps, a big wholemeal bun…anything. Either way its very simple and effective way to feed your friends and family. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

TIP: You should have quite a lot of sauce left, so bottle it and make sure you use it for any meat that needs a pick me up. Ribs, steak, sausages or anything else you find appealing. Also if you want it a little bit (or a lot)  spicier don’t be afraid to just whack in a good helping of dried chili flakes when you first start the process with the pork. Alternatively use some of this beautiful stuff, available online here http://www.mysecretkitchen.co.uk/products-passport/index.html to add a real southern American kick.

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Puff pastry tarts

This weekend made me realise something quite alarming. I haven’t given myself the time recently to have a good session in the kitchen and more so, put anything on the blog. So I made sure I could make something nice for lunch on Saturday for me and the other half that I could share with you all. I have been rather preoccupied as of late due to getting a new job and having a lot of information and new things to process as I have moved to a totally different industry, so Ive been having to prioritise that as you can imagine. Although it is definitely a positive thing as I now work for Marston’s brewery and in all honesty it is a huge step for me as I can now say that I work in an industry I am passionate about. Kind of a dream job as it involves the food and drink industry, its a huge, huge move for me and opens up a whole world of knowledge to me. (Beer/ food combinations are a very interesting topic!)

So anyway back on topic, the good lady has been on at me for a while to make her something from the old blog that I always harp on about as being one of my favourite recipes, and I felt this weekend was quite fitting as on Monday I start a new fitness regime in preparation for our holiday in France. If your going to treat yourself to something you might as well go all out anyway right?

Goats cheese and balsamic onion puff pastry tart

What you’ll need

1/2 roll of shop bought puff pastry

100g goats cheese

1 red onion finely chopped

balsamic dressing

green pesto

handful of rocket

small sprinkle of lemon juice

salt

pepper

olive oil

egg wash

Chorizo jam and spring onion puff pastry tart

1/2 roll shop bought puff pastry

1 jar chorizo jam

3 finely chopped spring onions

handful grated mozzarella

salt pepper

egg wash

Method

  1. Unload the pastry out of the box and roll out flat. Leave out of the fridge for 2 minutes before use. Preheat your oven at 200 degrees. Put a little oil in a frying pan and on a medium heat, lightly fry down the onion until translucent and soft, add 1.5 tablespoons of balsamic, the lemon juice and a good helping of salt and pepper. Turn the heat down to the lowest heat and stir well. The onions will take on the balsamic and become dark and aromatic. Take off the heat and leave to rest.
  2. cut into two equal square parts and fold over around all edges to create a barrier and a bit of a wall around each tart.
  3. lightly prick with a fork in the middle/base of the tart and brush both down with the egg wash.
  4. Place in the oven for 5 minutes until the starts to rise. When this happens remove them from the oven and on the first one add a tablespoon of pesto, spread evenly over the pastry. Followed by the onions and a few big slices of goats cheese… On the second tart spread the chorizo jam (dont be shy with it!) around then add the cheese, followed by the spring onions.
  5. Place back in the oven for 20 minutes at 160 degrees or until golden/brown.
  6. Remove and serve with a big salad and dress the goats cheese tart with a few spring of rocket

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As always a simple concept that makes for a really satisfying meal for you and the rest of the family… me and my fiance ate both on our own so be warned, if you have a family of four or more, double the volume. You will need it!

I will hopefully get round to doing that second part of the York article I promised this week so I will do my best to sort it out!

Have a great week everybody!

Phil

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Oriental vegetable noodles with grilled salmon and firecracker sauce

An old recipe I found, one of the first I ever wrote but certainly worth a go! Its my ode to the exiting and vibrant flavours involved in Chinese and Asian cooking. If your not a lover of fish substitute it with a few chicken breasts, whether its used as a summer treat sitting in your garden or a winter warmer eaten while snuggled up in your wing back chair on a Saturday night, its sure to go down well.

Oriental vegetable noodles with grilled salmon and firecracker sauce

To serve 2 you’ll need:

4 small Pak choi, quartered.

handful of button mushrooms, quartered.

4 baby corns , finely chopped.

100g Dried egg noodles. (usually flat packed in packs of four)

Mixed bell peppers, julienned.

4 spring onions, diced.

2 medium sized salmon fillets.

Pinch sea salt.

for the Firecracker sauce:

2 Tbsp rapeseed oil

1 cup chicken stock stock.

2 Tbsp red cooking wine.

3 Tbsp of soy sauce.

2 level Tspn garlic powder.

1 Tspn ground ginger.

2 Large fresh chili’s (I used 1 green and one red) finely chopped.

2 Tbsp of honey.

Method for the sauce:

1) Add the stock and wine, to a frying pan or wok. Bring to a gentle simmer.

2) Once at a simmer add the honey, garlic, ginger and chili’s (including the seeds!)

3) Now leave on a medium high heat for a few minutes until it reduces by half, then take it completely off the heat.

Method for the noodles:

Preheat your grill.

1) Add the salt to some water in a large saucepan and bring to the boil. Then add the noodles and veg leave for a few minutes on a high heat until the noodles soften, leaving some crunch in the veg.

2) Pat dry the salmon, adding a little salt and pepper to one side of each of the filets and place under the grill. grill for around 4-5 minutes each side. the flesh should release a milky, mayonaise sort of looking fat into the grill pan and will flake really easily once cooked. (Keep an eye on it and don’t over cook it as it really is key to the dish to have that lovely salmon on top!)

3) drain the noodles, retaining a little of the cooking water.

4) Put the sauce back on the heat and add the noodles, mixing well.

5) Serve the salmon on a bed of noodles, dress with any remaining sauce and devour!

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What makes a great christmas dinner for me?

Every year in my house (and possibly thousands of homes across the world) a debate ignites as to what is and isn’t traditional when it comes to the Christmas dinner.  Clearly the place to start is the bird. Everybody loves a Christmas turkey, it insights memories of home with the family, however well or badly cooked it is and will always be a symbol of Christmas in the western world, in my opinion. There are however, some factions that prefer to go slightly different and roast a goose or a duck. I see no problem with this but I find it difficult to imagine my own personal Christmas without a turkey on the table. I tend to sway towards two meats, the first being the turkey and the second, a roasted joint of gammon to go with it, I feel it really gives an additional dimension to the meal as a whole and helps to diversify the experience a little. So for me it has to be turkey, but doing something else to accompany it never hurts.

But what about the veg? I hear absolutely nobody cry, well, this is the subject which can fuel the debate from your first nibble of a sprout all the way through to the obligatory Christmas special soaps. From my point of view there are a handful of things that are ESSENTIAL to a Christmas dinner. These things are; Brussels sprouts, roast potatoes, carrots, mashed potato and roasted parsnips. Not everybody will agree with that I know but for me that’s Christmas veg in a (chest) nut shell, but this is challenged with a vast array of other peoples ideas of ‘traditional’ like cauliflower, broccoli, pea’s and even though not vegetables the addition of Yorkshire puddings still just puzzles me. But the more I ponder this the more I come to the same conclusion.

 

It doesn’t matter.

 

It doesn’t matter what goes on the plate at the end of the day, all that matters is what that food means to you. the taste of a dried out turkey that mom forgot to  get out because she was picking up the Christmas tree that the dog knocked over, or the smell of the fluffy goose fat roasted potatoes filling your nostrils, everybody has their own idea of what Christmas means to them and what represents that in terms of food. What makes A Christmas dinner for me? that’s a really easy question to answer. whatever me and my family feel will make a memorable meal and a dessert that just about fits in before we burst. the contents don’t really mean anything.

I love cooking for people and Christmas dinner just gives me another opportunity to do what I love and feed people with the results of some hard graft in the kitchen. So ultimately weather your roasting a goose, turkey, duck, leg of lamb, baking a potato or having ham and cheese toasties, if that’s what Christmas is to you, go for it. Enjoy it and have a great time with your loved ones like I intend to this year. I cant wait!

 

 

 

Freshly baked ciabatta bread

So I’ve been mulling over this particular article for a while and today is the day I finally get my act together and get it live. I have never been, and have never claimed to be particularly good at baking, although recently I have a much keener interest in it.

I have started from the ground up and started with making my own bread and I can confirm I am now hooked. Its hard to describe the feeling of accomplishment when it goes right and you end up with a really attractive end product emitting that soul warming smell that makes your home seem that little bit more special. Its a hard feeling to beat.

So rather than me harping on about it, here’s a recipe for you to do it yourself. I challenge you to do this once and not want to do it again!

Ingredients

500g strong white flour
450 ml Luke warm water
1/2 teaspoon sugar
1 ½ teaspoon dry Yeast
1 ½ teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons garlic granules
2 tablespoons oregano and\or 1 tablespoon cracked black pepper
Olive Oil

Method

Pre heat oven to 200C or gas mark 8

In a large bowl mix with clean hands flour, sugar, herbs and yeast

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Pour in the water and salt and mix in the bowl with your hands for 5 minutes. The mixture will be like a very thick paste.

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Lift parts of the dough up and fold it over itself to push in a few air pockets. Work the dough in the bowl for 5 minutes. If you have a food mixer, beat it with a dough hook but still finish off with the hand method to push the air pockets in.

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Flour a work surface and continue to work the dough until smooth.

Add 1 tablespoon of oil directly to the dough and mix into it by kneading for a few more minutes.

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Allow to prove in a clean bowl drizzled with a little more oil to stop it sticking, covered with cling film for about 1 hour or until it doubles in size.

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Pour the dough onto a well floured work surface and fold over like an envelope length ways to create the ciabatta ‘look’. At this point you can leave it as a loaf, cut into rolls or get creative and twist them up. Once shaped leave to prove for a further 20 minutes.

Lift dough onto a floured baking tray and (sprinkle some flour onto the top of the bread/s to create a more rustic look) bake for around 25 minutes, until golden and when tapped sounds hollow. Leave till cool on a wire rack or a spare grill pan for 15 minutes before serving.

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