Changing of the seasons

It has been a while since my last proper article and I am very sorry!. Preparation for the trip to London took over my schedule in between work.

Normal service will now be resumed with plenty of things in store in the coming weeks to get your taste buds squeaking with excitement and your empty belly impatiently grumbling for your next feed. Today had a very Autumnal nip to the air and it really started to hit home that summer is fizzling out quicker than anybody would like to admit. The abrupt change in the weather shifts my focus from the bright and colourful al fresco lunches in the garden to hearty, warming soups and huge roasts with beautiful crisp root vegetables and thick, rich gravy. The conkers are preparing to drop and the leaves are slowly making the transformation from their emerald green to their rustic, golden brown and that means a change in direction for everybody interested in seasonal culinary adventure. Put the kettle on and dust off your casserole dishes. Its going to be good!.

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Autumn is a great time to break out your crock pots or slow cooker. As I always say, never be afraid to try new things, and now is as good a time as any to make a change. A great suggestion for a seasonal alternative to the norm is rabbit. There are over 40 million rabbits in United Kingdom and we seldom use them in our modern day cooking, Which is a shame as now is the perfect time to get them. It’s just after mating season has passed giving them chance to feed and recharge so they are back in prime condition around now. Don’t let the image of them being a pet put you off, they were once a staple in this country and usually at under £5 for a whole rabbit, it can really save you some money too. Ill be developing a rabbit stew recipe for you very soon.

What’s new?

This coming month (October) will be Burger month on Gecko, celebrating my amazing experience with the www.simplybeefandlamb.co.uk battle of the burgers competition where, even though I didn’t win, I felt I did myself and the blog justice in showing the passion I have for cooking and food in general. It was an amazing experience where I met some incredible people and also learned a few things too from some talented cooks. I will be writing a full run down in the next 24 hours about my experience but thank you to everybody who made my presence there possible and supported me along the way.

So I hope everybody is still enjoying the last of their summer creations and prepared for all of the delights that the transformation into easily my second favourite season of the year.

Phil

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Roasted guinea fowl

As promised on the Facebook page last week, somewhat belatedly ill admit, here is my recipe for roast guinea fowl. I enjoyed this more than most of the dishes I usually cook due to the simple fact its a different experience to the norm, its a gamier and more adventurous alternative to chicken. Its something that if you haven’t tried it, you should. Mine came from Waitrose and was a grand total of £8.75. one average bird feeds 4 (2x breast, 2x legs)

So, now to the fun part. making it.

what you’ll need:

1x Guinea fowl. (No giblets)

1 sweet potato, sliced.

6-7 good size shallots

4 garlic cloves

1/2 cup chicken stock

red wine (for cooking)

handful of Chesnutt mushrooms

olive oil

pinch sea salt.

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Directions:

prep) Preheat oven to 180 degrees (electic oven) 160 degrees (fan assisted) or gas mark 4

1) Lay the bird in a roasting tray. Give it a teaspoon of olive oil and spread over the guinea fowl.

2) Lay the mushrooms, sweet potato, peeled garlic cloves and shallots in the tray with the bird.

3) Add the stock evenly and distribute around 2 tablespoons of the wine, Pinch of sea salt.

4) Roast the guinea fowl for around one hour twenty minutes, or until the juices run clear.

5) Leave to rest for a few minutes and serve with your choice of veg or alternatively with a spicy rice or couscous. Drizzle with the cooking juices in the tray, its amazing. You could also turn this into a gravy with a small amount of flour/ thickening, putting it back on the heat until its at your desired thickness, ready to lay a velvety blanket over your roast.

Try it!! Phil

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